The ‘Crowd Mind,’ ‘Trial Closes’ & ‘Pacing’


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| May 15, 2013 | 0 Comments

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I have kept my sales training to the basics because, just like in school, we aren’t able to read until we first learn our ABCs.
There is a lot of psychology connected to selling, because the customer is buying emotionally.
You all know that I hate psychobabble.
Unfortunately, in selling, the customer’s mind is making the decision to buy or not to buy.
A salesperson’s professional attitude influences a buyer, as can any other single factor. Develop professionalism in all the things you do; it pays high dividends in selling, as it does in business.
Many new salespeople are amazed at the change that sometimes comes over the prospect at the moment of closing. You have been getting along well. Every phase has seemed right. But then, for no apparent reason, the prospect freezes. He or she becomes nervous and tense. He or she might even become irritable, irrational or insulting. What has happened?
A moment ago, the individual seemed perfectly agreeable.
Psychologists explain this as the “crowd mind.”
Crowds, as you know, do not reason well. They are torn by indecision and are highly emotional, being capable of extreme emotions.
The buyer is suddenly afraid. He or she is afraid to buy. Thoughts of fear develop, such as, “I should wait before I place my order” and “I should talk this over with someone.” The question may arise, “How do I know that I can’t do better elsewhere?”
Your greatest weapon in combating this fear is your professional attitude. You must be confident, self-assured and poised.
The “crowd mind” wants a leader. Your professional attitude will give the prospect the leadership for which he or she is looking.
To overcome the “crowd mind,” you must…

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